Euclid: Reconstruction of weak-lensing mass maps for non-Gaussianity studies

Euclid: Reconstruction of weak-lensing mass maps for non-Gaussianity studies

Authors: S. Pires, V. Vandenbussche, V. Kansal, R. Bender, L. Blot, D. Bonino, A. Boucaud, J. Brinchmann, V. Capobianco, J. Carretero, M. Castellano, S. Cavuoti, R. Clédassou, G. Congedo, L. Conversi, L. Corcione, F. Dubath, P. Fosalba, M. Frailis, E. Franceschi, M. Fumana, F. Grupp, F. Hormuth, S. Kermiche, M. Knabenhans, R. Kohley, B. Kubik, M. Kunz, S. Ligori, P.B. Lilje, I. Lloro, E. Maiorano, O. Marggraf, R. Massey, G. Meylan, C. Padilla, S. Paltani, F. Pasian, M. Poncet, D. Potter, F. Raison, J. Rhodes, M. Roncarelli, R. Saglia, P. Schneider, A. Secroun, S. Serrano, J. Stadel, P. Tallada Crespí, I. Tereno, R. Toledo-Moreo, Y. Wang
Journal: Astronomy and Astrophysics
Year: 2020
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Abstract

Weak lensing, namely the deflection of light by matter along the line of sight, has proven to be an efficient method to constrain models of structure formation and reveal the nature of dark energy. So far, most weak lensing studies have focused on the shear field that can be measured directly from the ellipticity of background galaxies. However, within the context of forthcoming full-sky weak lensing surveys such as Euclid, convergence maps (mass maps) offer an important advantage over shear fields in terms of cosmological exploitation. While carrying the same information, the lensing signal is more compressed in the convergence maps than in the shear field, simplifying otherwise computationally expensive analyses, for instance non-Gaussianity studies. However, the inversion of the non-local shear field requires accurate control of systematic effects due to holes in the data field, field borders, noise and the fact that the shear is not a direct observable (reduced shear). In this paper, we present the two mass inversion methods that are being included in the official Euclid data processing pipeline: the standard Kaiser & Squires method (KS) and a new mass inversion method (KS+) that aims to reduce the information loss during the mass inversion. This new method is based on the KS methodology and includes corrections for mass mapping systematic effects. The results of the KS+ method are compared to the original implementation of the KS method in its simplest form, using the Euclid Flagship mock galaxy catalogue. In particular, we estimate the quality of the reconstruction by comparing the two-point correlation functions, third- and fourth-order moments obtained from shear and convergence maps, and we analyse each systematic effect independently and simultaneously. We show that the KS+ method reduces substantially the errors on the two-point correlation function and moments compared to the KS method. In particular, we show that the errors introduced by the mass inversion on the two-point correlation of the convergence maps are reduced by a factor of about 5 while the errors on the third- and fourth-order moments are reduced by a factor of about 2 and 10 respectively.

Benchmarking MRI Reconstruction Neural Networks on Large Public Datasets

Deep learning is starting to offer promising results for reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A lot of networks are being developed, but the comparisons remain hard because the frameworks used are not the same among studies, the networks are not properly re-trained, and the datasets used are not the same among comparisons. The recent release of a public dataset, fastMRI, consisting of raw k-space data, encouraged us to write a consistent benchmark of several deep neural networks for MR image reconstruction. This paper shows the results obtained for this benchmark, allowing to compare the networks, and links the open source implementation of all these networks in Keras. The main finding of this benchmark is that it is beneficial to perform more iterations between the image and the measurement spaces compared to having a deeper per-space network.

Reference:  Z. Ramzi, P. Ciuciu and J.-L. Starck. “Benchmarking MRI reconstruction neural networks on large public datasetsApplied Sciences, 10, 1816, 2020.  doi:10.3390/app10051816

Beyond self-acceleration: force- and fluid-acceleration

The notion of self acceleration has been introduced as a convenient way to theoretically distinguish cosmological models in which acceleration is due to modified gravity from those in which it is due to the properties of matter or fields. In this paper we review the concept of self acceleration as given, for example, by [1], and highlight two problems. First, that it applies only to universal couplings, and second, that it is too narrow, i.e. it excludes models in which the acceleration can be shown to be induced by a genuine modification of gravity, for instance coupled dark energy with a universal coupling, the Hu-Sawicki f(R) model or, in the context of inflation, the Starobinski model. We then propose two new, more general, concepts in its place: force-acceleration and field-acceleration, which are also applicable in presence of non universal cosmologies. We illustrate their concrete application with two examples, among the modified gravity classes which are still in agreement with current data, i.e. f(R) models and coupled dark energy.

As noted already for example in [35, 36], we further remark that at present non-universal couplings are among the (few) classes of models which survive gravitational wave detection and local constraints (see [12] for a review on models surviving with a universal coupling). This is because, by construction, baryonic interactions are standard and satisfy solar system constraints; furthermore the speed of gravitational waves in these models is  cT = 1 and therefore in agreement with gravitational wave detection. It has also been noted (see for example [37–39] and the update in [33]) that models in which a non-universal coupling between dark matter particles is considered would also solve the tension in the measurement of the Hubble parameter [40] due to the degeneracy beta - H0 first noted in Ref. [41].

Reference: L.Amendola, V.Pettorino  "Beyond self-acceleration: force- and fluid-acceleration", Physics Letters B, in press, 2020.

The first Deep Learning reconstruction of dark matter maps from weak lensing observational data

DeepMass: The first Deep Learning reconstruction of dark matter maps from weak lensing observational data (DES SV weak lensing data)

DeepMass

 This is the first reconstruction of dark matter maps from weak lensing observational data using deep learning. We train a convolution neural network (CNN) with a Unet based architecture on over 3.6 x 10^5 simulated data realisations with non-Gaussian shape noise and with cosmological parameters varying over a broad prior distribution.  Our DeepMass method is substantially more accurate than existing mass-mapping methods. With a validation set of 8000 simulated DES SV data realisations, compared to Wiener filtering with a fixed power spectrum, the DeepMass method improved the mean-square-error (MSE) by 11 per cent. With N-body simulated MICE mock data, we show that Wiener filtering with the optimal known power spectrum still gives a worse MSE than our generalised method with no input cosmological parameters; we show that the improvement is driven by the non-linear structures in the convergence. With higher galaxy density in future weak lensing data unveiling more non-linear scales, it is likely that deep learning will be a leading approach for mass mapping with Euclid and LSST.

Reference 1:  N. Jeffrey, F.  Lanusse, O. Lahav, J.-L. Starck,  "Learning dark matter map reconstructions from DES SV weak lensing data", Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, in press, 2019.

 

Radio Astronomical Images Restoration with Shape Constraint

 

Authors: F. NAMMOUR, M. A. SCHMITZ, F. M. NGOLÈ MBOULA, J.-L. STARCK, J. N. GIRARD
Journal: Proceedings of SPIE
Year: 2019
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Abstract

Weak gravitational lensing is a very promising probe for cosmology that relies on highly precise shape measurements. Several new instruments are being deployed and will allow for weak lensing studies on unprecedented scales, and at new frequencies. In particular, some of these new instruments should allow for the blooming of radio-weak lensing, specially the SKA with many Petabits per second of raw data. Hence, great challenges will be waiting at the turn. In addition, processing methods should be able to extract the highest precision possible and ideally, be applicable to radio-astronomy. For the moment, the two methods that already exist do not satisfy both conditions. In this paper, we present a new plug-and-play solution where we add a shape constraint to deconvolution algorithms and results show measurements improvement of at least 20%.

Space test of the Equivalence Principle: first results of the MICROSCOPE mission

Space test of the Equivalence Principle: first results of the MICROSCOPE mission

Authors: P. Touboul, G. Metris, M. Rodrigues, Y. André, Q. Baghi, J. Bergé, D. Boulanger, S. Bremer, R. Chhun, B. Christophe, V. Cipolla, T. Damour, P. Danto, H. Dittus, P. Fayet, B. Foulon, P.-Y. Guidotti, E. Hardy, P.-A. Huynh, C. Lämmerzahl, V. Lebat, F. Liorzou, M. List, I. Panel, S. Pires, B. Pouilloux, P. Prieur, S. Reynaud, B. Rievers, A. Robert, H. Selig, L. Serron, T. Sumner, P. Viesser
Journal: Classical and Quantum Gravity
Year: 2019
Download: ADS | arXivFait Marquant


Abstract

The Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP), stating that two bodies of different compositions and/or mass fall at the same rate in a gravitational field (universality of free fall), is at the very foundation of General Relativity. The MICROSCOPE mission aims to test its validity to a precision of 10^-15, two orders of magnitude better than current on-ground tests, by using two masses of different compositions (titanium and platinum alloys) on a quasi-circular trajectory around the Earth. This is realised by measuring the accelerations inferred from the forces required to maintain the two masses exactly in the same orbit. Any significant difference between the measured accelerations, occurring at a defined frequency, would correspond to the detection of a violation of the WEP, or to the discovery of a tiny new type of force added to gravity. MICROSCOPE's first results show no hint for such a difference, expressed in terms of Eötvös parameter δ =  [-1 +/- 9(stat) +/- 9 (syst)] x 10^-15 (both 1σ uncertainties) for a titanium and platinum pair of materials. This result was obtained on a session with 120 orbital revolutions representing 7% of the current available data acquired during the whole mission. The quadratic combination of 1σ uncertainties leads to a current limit on δ of about 1.3 x 10^-14.

Radio Astronomical Images Restoration with Shape Constraint

 

Authors: F. NAMMOUR, M. A. SCHMITZ, F. M. NGOLÈ MBOULA, J.-L. STARCK, J. N. GIRARD
Journal: Proceedings of SPIE
Year: 2019
Download: DOI

 


 

Abstract

Weak gravitational lensing is a very promising probe for cosmology that relies on highly precise shape measurements. Several new instruments are being deployed and will allow for weak lensing studies on unprecedented scales, and at new frequencies. In particular, some of these new instruments should allow for the blooming of radio-weak lensing, specially the SKA with many Petabits per second of raw data. Hence, great challenges will be waiting at the turn. In addition, processing methods should be able to extract the highest precision possible and ideally, be applicable to radio-astronomy. For the moment, the two methods that already exist do not satisfy both conditions. In this paper, we present a new plug-and-play solution where we add a shape constraint to deconvolution algorithms and results show measurements improvement of at least 20%.

The impact of baryonic physics and massive neutrinos on weak lensing peak statistics

The impact of baryonic physics and massive neutrinos on weak lensing peak statistics

 

Authors: M. Fong, M. Choi, V. Catlett, B. Lee, A. Peel, R. Bowyer,  L. J. King, I. G. McCarthy
Journal: MNRAS
Year: 2019
Download: ADS | arXiv


Abstract

We study the impact of baryonic processes and massive neutrinos on weak lensing peak statistics that can be used to constrain cosmological parameters. We use the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological simulations, which self-consistently include baryonic processes and the effect of massive neutrino free-streaming on the evolution of structure formation. We construct synthetic weak lensing catalogues by ray-tracing through light-cones, and use the aperture mass statistic for the analysis. The peaks detected on the maps reflect the cumulative signal from massive bound objects and general large-scale structure. We present the first study of weak lensing peaks in simulations that include both baryonic physics and massive neutrinos (summed neutrino mass Mν = 0.06, 0.12, 0.24, and 0.48 eV assuming normal hierarchy), so that the uncertainty due to physics beyond the gravity of dark matter can be factored into constraints on cosmological models. Assuming a fiducial model of baryonic physics, we also investigate the correlation between peaks and massive haloes, over a range of summed neutrino mass values. As higher neutrino mass tends to suppress the formation of massive structures in the Universe, the halo mass function and lensing peak counts are therefore modified as a function of Mν. Over most of the S/N range, the impact of fiducial baryonic physics is greater (less) than neutrinos for 0.06 and 0.12 (0.24 and 0.48) eV models. Both baryonic physics and massive neutrinos should be accounted for when deriving cosmological parameters from weak lensing observations.

Euclid: Non-parametric point spread function field recovery through interpolation on a Graph Laplacian

 

Authors: M.A. Schmitz, J.-L. Starck, F. Ngole Mboula, N. Auricchio, J. Brinchmann, R.I. Vito Capobianco, R. Clédassou, L. Conversi, L. Corcione, N. Fourmanoit, M. Frailis, B. Garilli, F. Hormuth, D. Hu, H. Israel, S. Kermiche, T. D. Kitching, B. Kubik, M. Kunz, S. Ligori, P.B. Lilje, I. Lloro, O. Mansutti, O. Marggraf, R.J. Massey, F. Pasian, V. Pettorino, F. Raison, J.D. Rhodes, M. Roncarelli, R.P. Saglia, P. Schneider, S. Serrano, A.N. Taylor, R. Toledo-Moreo, L. Valenziano, C. Vuerli, J. Zoubian
Journal: submitted to A&A
Year: 2019
Download:  arXiv

 


Abstract

Context. Future weak lensing surveys, such as the Euclid mission, will attempt to measure the shapes of billions of galaxies in order to derive cosmological information. These surveys will attain very low levels of statistical error and systematic errors must be extremely well controlled. In particular, the point spread function (PSF) must be estimated using stars in the field, and recovered with high accuracy.
Aims. This paper's contributions are twofold. First, we take steps toward a non-parametric method to address the issue of recovering the PSF field, namely that of finding the correct PSF at the position of any galaxy in the field, applicable to Euclid. Our approach relies solely on the data, as opposed to parametric methods that make use of our knowledge of the instrument. Second, we study the impact of imperfect PSF models on the shape measurement of galaxies themselves, and whether common assumptions about this impact hold true in a Euclid scenario.
Methods. We use the recently proposed Resolved Components Analysis approach to deal with the undersampling of observed star images. We then estimate the PSF at the positions of galaxies by interpolation on a set of graphs that contain information relative to its spatial variations. We compare our approach to PSFEx, then quantify the impact of PSF recovery errors on galaxy shape measurements through image simulations.
Results. Our approach yields an improvement over PSFEx in terms of PSF model and on observed galaxy shape errors, though it is at present not sufficient to reach the required Euclid accuracy. We also find that different shape measurement approaches can react differently to the same PSF modelling errors.

Euclid preparation III. Galaxy cluster detection in the wide photometric survey, performance and algorithm selection

 

Authors: Euclid Collaboration, R. Adam, ..., S. Farrens, et al.
Journal: A&A
Year: 2019
Download: ADS | arXiv


Abstract

Galaxy cluster counts in bins of mass and redshift have been shown to be a competitive probe to test cosmological models. This method requires an efficient blind detection of clusters from surveys with a well-known selection function and robust mass estimates. The Euclid wide survey will cover 15000 deg2 of the sky in the optical and near-infrared bands, down to magnitude 24 in the H-band. The resulting data will make it possible to detect a large number of galaxy clusters spanning a wide-range of masses up to redshift ∼2. This paper presents the final results of the Euclid Cluster Finder Challenge (CFC). The objective of these challenges was to select the cluster detection algorithms that best meet the requirements of the Euclid mission. The final CFC included six independent detection algorithms, based on different techniques, such as photometric redshift tomography, optimal filtering, hierarchical approach, wavelet and friend-of-friends algorithms. These algorithms were blindly applied to a mock galaxy catalog with representative Euclid-like properties. The relative performance of the algorithms was assessed by matching the resulting detections to known clusters in the simulations. Several matching procedures were tested, thus making it possible to estimate the associated systematic effects on completeness to <3%. All the tested algorithms are very competitive in terms of performance, with three of them reaching >80% completeness for a mean purity of 80% down to masses of 1014 M⊙ and up to redshift z=2. Based on these results, two algorithms were selected to be implemented in the Euclid pipeline, the AMICO code, based on matched filtering, and the PZWav code, based on an adaptive wavelet approach.